Swine Safety Quiz

Test your knowledge of swine safety by answering the following questions after you have completed the Swine Safety Lessons or watched the Swine Safety video clips. Good luck.
1 Ear plugs are the best safety choice to protect your ears from squealing pigs and clipper motors.
Fantastic! Ear plugs are the best choice to protect your ears when using motorized equipment, such as the clippers, and when working in an enclosed area where noises are loud - especially enclosed areas where pigs are squealing.
Oops! Ear plugs really are the best choice to protect your ears when using motorized equipment, such as the clippers, and when working in an enclosed area where noises are loud - especially enclosed areas where pigs are squealing.
2 Wearing latex or rubber gloves is the best choice for protecting your hands when washing or grooming your show pig.
Great! Latex or rubber gloves provide a barrier protecting you from the soap and dirt you are washing off your pig. During grooming they protect your skin from the products you might use to groom for a show and also from organisms on the pig's hide.
No is incorrect. Latex or rubber globes provide a barrier between you and the soap and dirt you are washing off your show pig. During grooming gloves protect your skin from the products you might use to groom for a show and also from organisms on the pig's hide.
3 You are more likely to hurt your back when lifting more than 15% of your body weight and carry a load farther than 10-15 yards.
That's right! Proper lifting and carrying will help prevent back injury. When you must lift a heavy object, remember to squat and bend at your knees keeping your head up and back straight, then lift with your leg muscles. When you have a distance to carry a heavy load - use wheels to help.
Oh no...safety failure. Experts say the three worst problems for agriculture are: full body stoop (bending forward and down from the waist, as when picking up feed bags, buckets, or show boxes); lifting/moving heavy objects (greater than 15% of body weight, i.e. feed bags, show boxes); and repetitive handwork (as when you are washing and clipping). Proper lifting and carrying will help prevent back injury. When you must lift a heavy object, remember to squat and bend at your knees keeping your head up and your back straight, then lift with your leg muscles. When you have a distance to carry a heavy load - use wheels to help.
4 A pig frightens easily and will usually grunt, bark or squeal when it is angry.
Hurray! When you know a little bit about pig behavior, you can be prepared for its reaction to a new place; such as the fairgrounds. Remember to be patient and allow your show pig time to adjust to its new surroundings at a show.
Not really. Pigs are sensitive to changes in their surroundings and frighten easily. Even very small changes can frighten a pig including new and unfamiliar sights, smells, and sounds at the fairgrounds. Being patient and allowing your show pig to adjust when it begins acting scared is safest for you and your pig.
5 A pig will stop when faced with a solid barrier.
You're absolutely right! A pig will stop when it encounters a solid barrier. That's why solid panels work well for sorting and moving pigs. Show ring helpers will likely use solid, hand-held panels to help move the pigs in the show ring.
Oops, that's not the best answer. A solid barrier prevents the pig from seeing every thing that is going on around it, which provides a low-stress way to move pigs. You will see solid hand-held panels used by ring helpers at the show to help efficiently move pigs to holding pens. Keeping your show pig as calm as possible is safest for you, your fellow exhibitors, and the pigs.
6 When you become excited or in a hurry, your show pig will sense the change in your behavior, which might scare it.
Spectacular! Pigs are smart and can sense behavior change in their handlers. When you become excited or in a hurry, your show pig may sense it and become scared which can cause it to try to run away.
That's not correct. Pigs are smart animals and can sense behavior change in their handlers. When you become excited or in a hurry, your show pig may sense it, become scared, and try to run away. When you don't have control of your pig it can be unsafe for you, the pig, or other exhibitors.
7 Practicing show day activities at home and again at the show will help you and your show pig.
Yes, you were really paying attention! Your show pig will be much more comfortable doing activities it has practiced before and it will be less likely to be scared of the show ring if it's been in there before the show.
Not! Your show pig will be much more comfortable doing activities it has practiced before and it will be less likely to be scared of the show ring if it's been in there before the show. Practice driving the pig to the show ring; driving in the ring using your show cane, stick, or whip; driving the pig back to its pen; driving the pig through gates; and washing and clipping it.
8 Neat and tidy buildings, alleys, and pens help keep you and your show pig safe.
Exceptional job! Slips, trips, and falls cause many injuries when working with livestock. When livestock working areas are neat and tidy, there's less chance someone will get hurt.
Sorry, that's just not correct. Keeping buildings, alleys, and pens neat and tidy helps prevent accidental injury. Remember: Slips, trips, and falls cause many injuries when working with livestock. Make sure you have a place to put all your supplies, equipment, and feed and keep all of those items in their proper place. Clean up spills as soon as they happen. Don't allow manure or feed to accumulate in alleyways.
8 Neat and tidy buildings, alleys, and pens help keep you and your show pig safe.
Exceptional job! Slips, trips, and falls cause many injuries when working with livestock. When livestock working areas are neat and tidy, there's less chance someone will get hurt.
Sorry, that's just not correct. Keeping buildings, alleys, and pens neat and tidy helps prevent accidental injury. Remember: Slips, trips, and falls cause many injuries when working with livestock. Make sure you have a place to put all your supplies, equipment, and feed and keep all of those items in their proper place. Clean up spills as soon as they happen. Don't allow manure or feed to accumulate in alleyways.
9 When using electrical equipment, use only power outlets with three-pronged receptacles; and outdoor receptacles should be waterproof and have ground fault circuit interrupters.
Brilliant! Three-pronged receptacles provide important grounding of electrical current and ground fault circuit interrupters will cut off the supply of electricity to protect you and your show animal from electric shock.
That's not the right answer. Be very careful using electric equipment. Three-pronged receptacles provide important grounding of electrical current and ground fault circuit interrupter outlet will cut off the supply of electricity to protect you and your show animal from electric shock, which is especially important when the floor where you are working may be wet.
10 It's a good idea to keep a first aid kit in your show box and in the barn.
Well Done! Most injury incidents involving livestock are minor bumps, bruises, cuts or scrapes. Everyone should learn basic first aid and keep a first aid kit in your show box and in the barn or an out building where you stall your show pig.
Better think on that one some more. Most injury incidents involving livestock are minor bumps, bruises, cuts or scrapes. Everyone should learn basic first aid and keep a first aid kit in your show box and in the barn or building where you stall your show pig.