Sheep Safety Quiz

Test your knowledge of sheep safety by answering the following questions after you have completed the Sheep Safety Lessons or watched the Sheep Safety video clips. Good luck.
1 Long sleeves and long pants are the best choice for protecting yourself when working with or showing sheep.
Fantastic! To protect your skin from sun damage, dirt, and animal dander, long sleeves and long pants are the best choice. When it's just too hot to wear long sleeves outdoors be sure to use sunscreen and regularly wash exposed skin with soap.
Oops! Your first option for personal protection when working with show sheep is your clothing. To protect your skin from sun damage, dirt, and animal dander, long sleeves and long pants are the best choice. When it's just too hot to wear long sleeves outdoors be sure to use sunscreen and regularly wash exposed skin with soap.
2 When working with your show sheep, wash hands often with soap and use hand sanitizer between washings.
Great! Hand contact with the sheep's wool, hide, dander, manure, or urine creates an opportunity for disease to pass from your sheep to you. Bacteria and viruses can be spread to humans or from humans to animals.
No is incorrect. The best choice for personal safety is to wash your hands with soap – often - and use hand sanitizer between washings or when soap is not available. Hand contact with the animal's hide, dander, manure, or urine creates an opportunity for disease to pass from your sheep to you. Bacteria and viruses can be spread to humans or from humans to animals.
3 You are more likely to hurt your back when lifting more than 15% of your body weight and carry a load farther than 10-15 yards.
That's right! Proper lifting and carrying will help prevent back injury. When you must lift a heavy object, remember to squat and bend at your knees keeping your head up and back straight, then lift with your leg muscles. When you have a distance to carry a heavy load - use wheels to help.
Oh no…safety failure. Experts say the three worst problems for agriculture are: full body stoop (bending forward and down from the waist, as when picking up feed bags, buckets, or show boxes); lifting/moving heavy objects (greater than 15% of body weight, i.e. feed bags, show boxes); and repetitive handwork (as when you are washing and clipping). Proper lifting and carrying will help prevent back injury. When you must lift a heavy object, remember to squat and bend at your knees keeping your head up and your back straight, then lift with your leg muscles. When you have a distance to carry a heavy load – use wheels to help.
4 Show sheep that are handled gently will be easier to handle than show sheep that are rough handled.
Hurray! Work with your show sheep regularly and you will experience positive results. Sheep that are handled gently and quietly will have smaller flight zones and be easier to handle than sheep that have been handled roughly or have had little human contact.
Not the correct response. Work with your show sheep regularly and you will experience positive results. Sheep that are handled gently and quietly will have smaller flight zones and be easier to handle than sheep that have been handled roughly or have had little human contact.
5 Sheep have a wide field of vision, which means they can see nearly everything around them without moving their head.
You're absolutely right! When you know about sheep behavior, it becomes much safer to work with them. Sheep have a wide field of vision, which means they can see nearly everything around them without moving their head. A sheep will pick up slight movements from a distance and may even start to run if the movement frightens it.
Oops, that's not the best answer. Sheep have a wide field of vision, which means they can see nearly everything around them without moving their head. A sheep will pick up slight movements from a distance and may even start to run if the movement frightens it. When you know about sheep behavior, it becomes much safer to work with them.
6 Sheep move quickly and are surprisingly strong for their size.
Spectacular! Just because it's smaller than a steer, do not underestimate a sheep's strength and be prepared to react quickly yet calmly if it decides to bolt.
That's not correct. Sheep are quick and surprisingly strong for their size. Do not underestimate their strength and be prepared to react quickly yet calmly. Remember, if frightened it will try to run and if you're hanging on to the halter and not in control your sheep might just drag you along too.
7 When you understand how your sheep might act in different situations you can use that knowledge to help make livestock shows safer for everyone.
Yes, you were really paying attention! Understanding how your sheep might react to all the extra activities at a show and keeping it calm are good ways to keep you, your sheep, and others from getting hurt.
Not! As the owner of your show sheep, it's your responsibility to keep it under control – even in crowded areas. Move slowly to and from the show ring with your sheep. Many people do not understand how easy it is to scare a show animal, because they usually look so calm when they are being led. Practice show day activities often to help your sheep become comfortable with the routine.
8 When using electrical equipment, use only power outlets with three-pronged receptacles; and outdoor receptacles should be waterproof and have ground fault circuit interrupters.
Brilliant! Three-pronged receptacles provide important grounding of electrical current and ground fault circuit interrupters will cut off the supply of electricity to protect you and your show sheep from electric shock.
That's not the right answer. Be very careful using electric equipment. Three-pronged receptacles provide important grounding of electrical current and ground fault circuit interrupter outlet will cut off the supply of electricity to protect you and your show sheep from electric shock, which is especially important when the floor where you are working may be wet.
9 It's a good idea to keep a first aid kit in your show box and in the barn.
Well Done! Most injury incidents involving livestock are minor bumps, bruises, cuts or scrapes. Everyone should learn basic first aid and keep a first aid kit in your show box and in the barn or an out building where you stall your show sheep.
Better think on that one some more. Most injury incidents involving livestock are minor bumps, bruises, cuts or scrapes. Everyone should learn basic first aid and keep a first aid kit in your show box and in the barn or building where you stall your show sheep.
10 Neat and tidy buildings, alleys, and pens help keep you and your show sheep safe.
Exceptional job! Slips, trips, and falls cause many injuries when working with livestock. When livestock working areas are neat and tidy, there's less chance someone will get hurt.
Sorry, that's just not correct. Keeping buildings, alleys, and pens neat and tidy helps prevent accidental injury. Remember: Slips, trips, and falls cause many injuries when working with livestock. Make sure you have a place to put all your supplies, equipment, and feed and keep all of those items in their proper place. Clean up spills as soon as they happen. Don't allow manure or feed to accumulate in alleyways.