Beef Safety Quiz

Test your knowledge of beef safety by answering the following questions after you have completed the Beef Safety Lessons or watched the Beef Safety video clips. Good luck.
1 Wearing latex or rubber gloves is the best choice for protecting your hands when washing or grooming your beef show animal.
Way to go! Latex or rubber gloves provide a barrier protecting you from the soap and dirt you are washing off your animal. During grooming they protect your skin from the sprays you might use to groom for a show and also from organisms in animal dander.
Better luck on the next one. – Latex or rubber globes provide a barrier between you and the soap and dirt you are washing off your beef show animal. During grooming they protect your skin from the sprays you might use to groom for a show and also from organisms in animal dander.
2 It's a good idea to wear safety glasses when clipping and grooming your beef show animal.
Terrific! You learned that safety glasses protect your eyes from hair clippings, dirt, and grooming products.
In fact, no. Safety glasses are the best choice in personal protection when clipping and grooming because they help protect your eyes from hair clippings, dirt, and grooming products. There are even tinted safety glasses for working outdoors.
3 The safest way to lift a heavy object off the ground is to bend at your knees to lower yourself to the object then lift using your leg muscles.
That's right! The safest way to lift from low places is to bend at your knees until you can reach the object. Then lift using your legs, not your back. Always be careful when lifting and when a load is too heavy, ask for help.
Actually, the safest way to lift a heavy object from the ground is to bend at your knees until you can reach the object. Then grasp the object and lift using the muscles in your legs to do the work. Keep the object being lifted close to your body and be careful. If the load is too heavy, ask someone to help.
4 Wide-angle vision means cattle can see all the way around them (except for a blind spot behind the tail) without turning their head.
You're absolutely right! Wide-angle vision means your show steer or heifer can see almost everything that is happening in front of and beside it.
Sorry, that's not right. Wide-angle vision means your show steer or heifer can see almost everything that is happening in front of and beside it. All those distractions can cause it to get a little jumpy sometimes, so you have to be extra careful at shows and fairs when there’s lots of extra activity.
5 Practicing show day activities will help you and your show steer or heiver get ready for the fair.
Spectacular! Your show steer or heifer will be much more comfortable doing activities it has practiced before and it will be less likely to be scared of the show ring on show day if you’ve practiced in there before.
Oops, that’s not the answer we were looking for. Your show steer or heifer will be much more comfortable doing activities it has practiced before and it will be less likely to be scared of the show ring on show day if you’ve practiced in there before. Keeping your show animal calm will be safer for you and for everyone at the show.
6 When a show steer or heifer is frightened it will most often try to run away from whatever scared it.
You're absolutely right! Fear causes an animal to run away from whatever scared it. Animals can also develop permanent fear memories that may never be erased, so it is important to do everything you can to keep your show steer or heifer as calm as possible. Frightened animals make shows unsafe for everyone (exhibitors and spectators) as well as the other animals.
Not exactly. Fear causes an animal to run away from whatever scared it. Animals can also develop permanent fear memories that may never be erased, so it is important to do everything you can to keep your show steer or heifer as calm as possible. Frightened animals make shows unsafe for everyone (exhibitors and spectators) as well as the other animals.
7 If possible, try to stay away from crowded areas when leading your show steer or heifer - especially when you are in a public place such as the fairgrounds.
Yes, you were really paying attention! Many people do not understand how easy it is to scare a show animal, because they usually look so calm on the halter. You may have to lead your show animal through crowded areas to get to the show ring. It's your responsibility to keep your animal under control.
Not! For the everyone's safety, do the best you can to keep away from crowded areas while leading your show steer or heifer at the fair. You may have to lead your show animal through crowded areas to get to the show ring. It's your responsibility to keep your animal under control. Most people don't understand how easy it is to scare a show animal, because it usually looks so calm and those who are familiar with animals often think they can't be hurt but we must remember - animals are unpredictable.
8 Keeping yourself and your show steer or heifer safe includes making sure buildings, pens/lots, and equipment are well maintained and in proper working order.
Exceptional job! The facilities where you house and work with your show steer or heifer should be well designed, strong, and safe for you and your animals.
Here's why that answer is wrong - The facilities you use to house and work your show steer or heifer should be well designed, strong, and safe for you and your animals.
9 When using electrical equipment, use only power outlets with three-pronged receptacles; and outdoor receptacles should be waterproof and have ground fault circuit interrupters.
Spectacular! Three-pronged receptacles provide important grounding of electrical current and ground fault circuit interrupters will cut off the supply of electricity to protect you and your show animal from electric shock.
That's not the right answer. Be very careful using electric equipment. Three-pronged receptacles provide important grounding of electrical current and ground fault circuit interrupter outlet will cut off the supply of electricity to protect you and your show animal from electric shock, which is especially important when the floor where you are working may be wet.
10 It's a good idea to keep a first aid kit in your show box and in the barn.
Well Done! Most injury incidents involving livestock are minor bumps, bruises, cuts or scrapes. Everyone should learn basic first aid and keep a first aid kit in your show box and in the barn or building where you stall your show steer or heifer.
Better think on that one some more. Most injury incidents involving livestock are minor bumps, bruises, cuts or scrapes. Everyone should learn basic first aid and keep a first aid kit in your show box and in the barn or building where you stall your show steer or heifer.