1. K-State home
  2. »Engineering
  3. »BAE
  4. »Extension Programs
  5. »Kansas AgrAbility Project
  6. »FAQ

Biological and Agricultural Engineering

FAQ

How much does a modification cost on a 4020 John Deere 1965?

That depends on what type of a modification you want to make to the tractor. Can you be more specific?

I am a diabetic, arthritis, and will Be tested for heart disease. Our Equipment is old. Are there Any programs that would help Buy a tractor with a cab. Also A combine with a cab with air Conditioning, and a no till Drill so would not need to Spend so many hours in The field. Thank you

Vocational Rehabilitation can provide some funding for equipment modifications or purchases to help accommodate a limitation in agriculture. You can contact VR directly through your local Social Rehabilitation Services office or you could provide your contact information and we could have an AgrAbility Ag Specialist get in touch with you to explain the program and help you get in touch with VR. Equipment upgrades are legitimate farm expenses and if they are necessary for you to continue farming, a local ag banker, your local Farm Credit office, or even the USDA Farm Service Agency might be able to help with a loan.

How does a person apply?

Simply call our toll free number (1-800-526-3648) and ask to have someone with AgrAbility return your call. The Assistive Technology Ag Specialist who returns your call will discuss your situation and what modifications might be needed to keep farming and will help determine if a farm visit will be necessary.

Are there costs associated with receiving services from Kansas AgrAbility?

No. AgrAbility projects are not allowed by their contracts with USDA-NIFA to charge customers for services provided within the scope of the program guidelines. Kansas AgrAbility may recommend resources, assistive technology, or expert consulting services (such as a professional engineer). There may be costs associated with referrals.

Do I have to live on a farm to receive AgrAbility services?

No. Anyone with a disability, disease, or disorder who is engaged in farming, ranching, or other agriculture-related occupation is eligible to receive services from the Kansas AgrAbility Project.